Archive

Posts Tagged ‘europe’

Prague in the Wintertime


On the occasion of my wife’s birthday we decided to head for an impromptu 3-day city break to Prague. This was a bit of a risk in February as chances were good that we could suffer an ice-locked endurance trial of a city break – as had happened to me and my sister in 2006 – but fortune smiled upon us and we were blessed with clement and mild weather for most of our visit. We had a grand time and hope to make it back sometime in the summer.

More photos from this trip can be found over on Flickr.

Swans on the Vltava and the Charles Bridge
Swans on the Vltava and the Charles Bridge

St Vitus Cathedral
St Vitus Cathedral

St John of Nepomuk Brass Plaque, Charles Bridge
John of Nepomuk Brass Plaque, Charles Bridge

Statues of Charles Bridge
Statues of Charles Bridge

Seagulls, Charles Bridge
Seagulls, Charles Bridge

Wenceslas Square
Wenceslas Square

Grand Hotel Europa, Wenceslas Square
Grand Hotel Europa, Wenceslas Square

Tesla Radio Stained Glass
Tesla Radio Stained Glass

Statues in Franciscan Garden, Nove Mesto
Statues in Franciscan Garden, Nove Mesto

Night View of the Charles Bridge from Mala Strana
Night View of the Charles Bridge from Mala Strana

View of the Charles Bridge and Prague Castle by Night
View of the Charles Bridge and Prague Castle by Night

My favourite bits of 2013


2013 has been a great year; I got married, I had a great honeymoon, got a promotion, and got to have a lot of fun on the sides travelling around Europe and Asia and getting to a festival or two.

These are a few of my favourite experiences from the past year.

Rome
In March, on a work trip, I happened to spend one night in Rome on the very night that the new Pope – Francis – was unveiled to the world. I was in St Peter’s Square when it happened and the excitement was undeniable, even to a heathen atheist like me. Later in the year I returned to Rome and got to spend a bit more time rediscovering this fantastic city.

Three nuns, Via San Pio X, the Vatican

Three nuns, Via San Pio X, the Vatican

Colosseum at Dusk

Colosseum at Dusk

Albergo Abruzzi in morning light

Albergo Abruzzi in morning light

 

Paris
Over the course of the year I travelled to Paris quite a few times for work, and tried to get out for an hour or two’s shooting when I was able. More photos here and here.

Catching up outside Nos Ancetres Les Gaulois, Ile-St-Louis

Catching up outside Nos Ancetres Les Gaulois, Ile-St-Louis

Sunset, the Seine, and a Bateau Mouche

Sunset, the Seine, and a Bateau Mouche

Notre Dame and Rainbow

Notre Dame and Rainbow

Taschen Bookstore on the Rue de Buci, Paris

Taschen Bookstore on the Rue de Buci, Paris

 

Provence & Monaco
A long weekend family trip took us down to the French Riviera, the Gorges du Verdon and the harbour of Monaco. More photos here.

The Watcher, near Cap d'Ail

The Watcher, near Cap d’Ail

Moustiers, Gorge du Verdon

Moustiers, Gorge du Verdon

Monaco Harbour

Monaco Harbour

 

Glastonbury Festival 2013
I thought I was through with Glastonbury, but the lure of Chic and the Rolling Stones proved irresistible; we had a blast.

Hula Hoop Jesus (AKA Pirate Dan, AKA the Charity Bin Painter), W

Hula Hoop Jesus (AKA Pirate Dan, AKA the Charity Bin Painter), W

The Phoenix Rises at the Rolling Stones

The Phoenix Rises at the Rolling Stones

Goat at the West Holts Stage

Goat at the West Holts Stage

 

Notting Hill Carnival 2013
Living in west London, I try to go to Carnival every year if I can manage, even if just for a few hours or one day of it. Always brings a smile to my face. More photos here.

Mas Dancers, Notting Hill Carnival

Mas Dancers, Notting Hill Carnival

Family Time at Notting Hill Carnival

Family Time at Notting Hill Carnival

 

Bangkok
At the end of August I went back to Bangkok for a work trip and managed to find time to search out some places I hadn’t been before, including Chinatown and the Khlong Lat Mayom floating market. More photos here.

Racing Home, Chao Phraya River, Bangkok

Racing Home, Chao Phraya River, Bangkok

Khlong Lat Mayom Floating Market, Bangkok

Khlong Lat Mayom Floating Market, Bangkok

Buddhist Monk on Yaowarat Road, Bangkok

Buddhist Monk on Yaowarat Road, Bangkok

Lottery Ticket Selling is Hard Work, Yaowarat Road, Chinatown, Bangkok

Lottery Ticket Selling is Hard Work, Yaowarat Road, Chinatown, Bangkok

 

Our Wedding
It’s safe to say our wedding day was the highlight of our year, and it was excellently documented by the talented Dean Govier. Go check out his portfolio of our day.

Our Wedding - Photo by Dean Govier

Our Wedding – Photo by Dean Govier

 

Our Honeymoon
Neatly closing out the highlights of the year, and recently featured in this blog, our three-week honeymoon took us through Malaysia, Java, Bali and the Gili Islands, and was a once-in-a-lifetime trip. It was hard to come home from this one!

Laughing Market Trader, Dungun Market

Laughing Market Trader, Dungun Market

Sunrise at Tanjong Jara, Malaysia

Sunrise at Tanjong Jara, Malaysia

Petronas Towers Sunset Panorama, Kuala Lumpur

Petronas Towers Sunset Panorama, Kuala Lumpur

Borobudur Panorama

Borobudur Panorama

Yam Cracker Lady, Candirejo Village, Borobudur

Yam Cracker Lady, Candirejo Village, Borobudur

Pasar Beringharjo Market, Yogyakarta

Pasar Beringharjo Market, Yogyakarta

Red Dragonfly on Leaf, Four Seasons Sayan

Red Dragonfly on Leaf, Four Seasons Sayan

Jatuliwiyah Rice Terraces

Jatuliwiyah Rice Terraces

Macaque, Uluwatu, Bali

Macaque, Uluwatu, Bali

Sunset from the Rock Bar, Ayana Resort, Bali

Sunset from the Rock Bar, Ayana Resort, Bali

 

2014 has a lot to live up to….

Rome and the Election of Pope Francis

March 18, 2013 1 comment

Last week I went on a work trip to Rome, my first visit in nearly 20 years, for one night only. So imagine my surprise to find myself there, totally by coincidence, the same night that a new Pope was elected…

Of course I knew that it was a possibility, but I figured that it was pretty likely that I would miss the event itself due to being at the office, and that it would be enough, perhaps, just to visit Saint Peter’s Square and see the pilgrims and the curious waiting for that magic puff of white smoke.

After I finished my day’s work and was dropped off next to the Forum, I snapped a few shots and then checked into my hotel before a look round the old quarter.

Statue of Julius Caesar and Santi Luca e Martina, Roman Forum

Statue of Julius Caesar and Santi Luca e Martina, Roman Forum

I took my new mini tripod out with me, and had the smaller Lumix LX7 in place of my normal Canon 7D, it being a work trip. It was raining and I got some nice shots of the Pantheon and the Piazza della Rotonda in the rain.

The Pantheon and Piazza della Rotonda, Centro Storico, Rome

The Pantheon and Piazza della Rotonda, Centro Storico, Rome

Then, as I meandered around in the area of the Piazza Navona, bells began to ring, and, sensing something might be amiss, I started walking in the direction of the Vatican, 1km away and on the other side of the Tiber. As I walked, a quick check of Twitter confirmed that white smoke had indeed been sighted, indicating that the Cardinals had selected a new Pope after several rounds of voting.

Learning this, I hurried through the back alleys of the Centro Storico towards the Tiber. Once out onto the riverbank, the evening rush hour traffic was besieged with pedestrians crossing haphazardly across towards the Ponte Vittorio Emmanuel II, which was blocked to vehicle traffic and was now full of Romans, tourists and pilgrims walk-running across to the Borgo Santo Spirito, the wide avenue leading to Saint Peter’s Square and the Vatican. There was a palpable sense of excitement and urgency, as all knew the square would fill quickly now that the word was out.

Romans rush to Saint Peter's Square

Romans rush to Saint Peter’s Square

I entered the square, where tens of thousands were already present, a sea of umbrellas interspersed with roving camera crews interviewing anyone they could find to fill airtime while they awaited the coming announcement. I managed to make it inside the main crowd barrier, undergoing a cursory bag and body check, and then I was in, amongst the faithful and the merely curious (I definitely fall into the latter category).

Worldwide media in Saint Peter's Square

Worldwide media in Saint Peter’s Square

Then the waiting began. I tried to fill the time with taking pictures of the Swiss Guards on ceremonial manoeuvres, and by putting my LX7 on the tripod, held in aloft in my head to get overhead pictures of the crowd. Typically for being in the middle of a historical event in the 21st century, everyone was in possession of a mobile phone and/or camera, and of course this meant that the 3G network folded. I tried in vain to share a photo or two with the folks back home.

Romans await the announcement of the election of Pope Francis

Romans await the announcement of the election of Pope Francis

The Crowd Awaits the Announcement

The Crowd Awaits the Announcement

Soon enough, the balcony lit up, the red curtains parted, and French Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran made the formal announcement we had all been waiting for: “Annuntio vobis gaudium magnum… habemus papam!” – “I announce to you a great joy… we have a pope!” The new Pope was announced as being Cardinal Bergoglio of Argentina, a Jesuit, who would be the first pope to take the name Francisco (Francis). This thrilled the crowd as not only was he the first Jesuit, the first South American, and the first Pope Francis, but he shared the name Francisco with the current star of the Roma football team – surely a good omen. Some Argentineans nearby waved their flag around like they had just won a football match.

One of the things that struck me that night in the Vatican was that when the announcement was made, and when the new Pope appeared for the first time, a sea of camera screens appeared in the audience: it seemed virtually everyone (myself included) was recording the event despite the TV cameras and press doing a much better job of it. Charlie Brooker was right, we have turned into a world of passive recorders, drones with phones. I realised that this would not have been the case in 2005 – as digital cameras were not nearly as pervasive – and the iPhone had not yet been released.

Habemas Papam

Habemas Papam

After a time, the papal rug was hung over the balcony, the Cardinals appeared along the side balconies, and the red curtains parted again to reveal the new Pope Francis. He waited a while for the crowd’s raucous applause to die down, and then began simply “Brothers and sisters… good evening!” He was disarmingly humble, and the crowd ate his words up, rapt with attention.

Pope Francis makes his first public appearance, Saint Peter's Sq

Pope Francis makes his first public appearance, Saint Peter’s Sq

Catholic Priest listens to the first address of Pope Francis

Catholic Priest listens to the first address of Pope Francis

When his address was concluding, I was mindful of a dinner commitment with a colleague that I was almost certain to be late for, and I knew that this square would take a while to empty, so I moved towards the edges. Soon enough everyone had the same idea and the sheer number of people trying to get out of the north side of the square through the colonnades turned into a somewhat dangerous crush, as the barricades were rammed on the other side with latecomers who hadn’t managed to get in, and the guards were slow to open the gates.

Latecomers held back behind the barricades

Latecomers held back behind the barricades

After a hair-raising 10-15 minutes we managed to squeeze out of the gates and into the street, where I saw two groups of nuns from the same order bound up to each other and, squealing like schoolgirls, proceed to jump on each other and group-hug. Pretty sure I will never see that happen again.

Returning to the main avenue, a stream of people left Saint Peter’s the way they had came, nuns and all.

Saint Peter's Square empties after the announcement

Saint Peter’s Square empties after the announcement

Three nuns, Via San Pio X, the Vatican

Three nuns, Via San Pio X, the Vatican

Although I am not religious, I felt incredibly fortunate that the first night I happened to be in Rome in 20 years coincided with the historic announcement of the new Pope. It’s not often you get this sort of chance to see history in the making, up close, and it’s humbling when you think of the relatively tiny number of people in the history of the Catholic Church who have actually been present to witness these announcements.

I only wish I had brought my big camera. The LX7 is a great little camera but no match for a proper DSLR with a good lens on it.

If you’ve made it down here this far, I will “reward” you with my own compilation of amateurish home video from the night:

The next morning I had an hour or so to look around the Centro Storico again before going to work, so I checked out the Pantheon again, before heading back to the Forum and the Colisseum. This short taster definitely whetted my appetite to return to Rome armed with more time, a proper camera, and my trusty travel companion and soon-to-be wife.

Rotunda of the Pantheon

Rotunda of the Pantheon

The Roman Forum and the Palatine Hill

The Roman Forum and the Palatine Hill

The Arch of Constantine

The Arch of Constantine

The Colisseum of Rome, East Side

The Colisseum of Rome, East Side

Of course, as usual you may find more photos from this set over on Flickr.

Habemas Papem


Habemas Papem by Luke Robinson
Habemas Papem, a photo by Luke Robinson on Flickr.

I was extremely fortunate that my first night in Rome in nearly 20 years coincided with the selection and announcement of the new Pope, Francis. More photos to come when I get back to London.

One of the things that struck me tonight in the Vatican was that when the announcement was made, and when the new Pope appeared for the first time, a sea of camera screens appeared in the audience, it seemed virtually everyone (myself included) was recording the event despite the TV cameras and press doing a much better job of it. Charlie Brooker was right, we have turned into a world of passive recorders, drones with phones. I realised that this would not have been the case in 2005 – as digital cameras were not nearly as pervasive – and the iPhone had not yet been released.

Rainy Day, Ile-St-Louis


Rainy Day, Ile-St-Louis by Luke Robinson
Rainy Day, Ile-St-Louis, a photo by Luke Robinson on Flickr.

I found myself in Paris for work at the end of last week, and despite having little time and the weather being uncooperative, I managed to get a shot or two. I look forward to returning in better weather.

My 2012: Photographic Year-End Review

December 30, 2012 3 comments

It’s been a good year, again. A lot of travel (43 cities, 12 countries, 100K+ kilometers), a lot of laughs, a lot of good food. A promotion and the largest deal we’ve ever done closed at work. And, most importantly, a kind young lady agreed to marry me. I end 2012 feeling very fortunate.

NOTE If you are reading this in a news reader such as Google Reader, or inside Facebook on a tablet, you might want to open this in a dedicated browser window as the photo layout may work better.

JANUARY
In January I returned to Scotland in winter, this time to the Isle of Skye, accompanied by my good friend (and accomplished photographer) Corin Dimoupolous and guided by local expert landscape photographer David Langan. We spent a long weekend exploring the island, and, weather permitting, shooting a few landscapes.

 

FEBRUARY

The coldest month saw us on a mini-break to an even colder place: Berlin. Despite icy temperatures we had a great time exploring both the historic and modern aspects of this vibrant city. We ate well and drank better.

 

MARCH, APRIL, MAY

These months were fairly quiet, at least in terms of photography for me, as they consisted mostly of a series of work trips which didn’t allow much time for quality snapping. Must do better.

However, I did manage a few shots around London in the downtime.

John Terry, Frank Lampard, Meirelles and Bosingwa - Champions of Europe

Farringdon Approach

 

JUNE

June saw another personal trip to France for a wedding in the Dordogne – but first stop was a few days in Paris. (More Paris shots can be found in the original blog post.)

Eiffel Tower from the Palais de Chaillot, by night

Sunset at the Louvre

After Paris we moved to the Dordogne and Limousin region for our friends’ wedding. This was a lovely few days in rural southern France, touring the medieval fortress towns along the river, and eating as much duck, pate, and Limousin beef as we could manage. Again, for more photos go and check out the original blog post.

Castelnaud-la-Chappelle

Canalside door, Brantome

 

JULY AND AUGUST

In the late summer, London was host to the 2012 Olympics and we were lucky enough to visit the Olympic Park as well as going to see the Men’s Hockey and the Men’s Basketball Final. It was a magical time in London, and I will always remember what it was like to be here in the thick of it.

 

In late August I went back to Paris for the first of a series of work trips there, and I managed to catch a perfect summer’s day along the banks of the Seine.

Boules on the Paris Plage

Sunset in Paris

 

SEPTEMBER

We began September with a lovely late-summer break to the Cyclades: a two-part trip to Mykonos, famed for its maze-like streets and raucous nightlife, and Santorini, land of a million postcard views. More photos can be found in the original blog post.

 

The morning after I returned from Santorini, I boarded another flight to Bangkok for work. Fortunately I allowed myself an extra day there to get reacquainted with this city, and to sample some of the myriad food delights on offer in its street stalls and markets…

 

OCTOBER

Early October saw me on yet another work trip, this time to Ankara and Istanbul in Turkey, where I was fortunate enough to have a few free hours to myself here and there to wander the old town and the nightlife district of Beyoglu. It’s always good to return to Istanbul.

 

NOVEMBER and DECEMBER

November and December were all about our trip to Japan and Hong Kong. Though I am only about a third of the way through processing the photos from that trip, what I have gone through thus far is encouraging and more photo reports from this trip will be gracing this blog over the course of January. Of course, this is the trip that hosted the aforementioned proposal, so it has a special place in my heart.

First up: Tokyo

 

And, of course, the rural beauty of Hakone and Nara:

 

That’s about all for 2012, photo-wise at least. I am happy that we’ve had a fulfilling year. Here’s to 2013 being bigger and better!

Happy New Year
Luke Robinson

A night and a day in Istanbul

October 18, 2012 2 comments

Another week, another work trip, this time to Turkey to visit a partner. Luckily I was able to cap my trip off with a free night and a free morning to revisit this beautiful city. From the tourist hotspots of Sultanahmet, through the fish sandwich vendors of Galata, and the bazaar district up through to the Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul once again proved itself to be a most photogenic city and I look forward to my next visit there.

These photos may also be found over on Flickr in case you’d like to comment or share them individually.